Major Horace A. Conant and the Planter’s House Hotel Meeting

Many of us know the story of the infamous Planter’s House Hotel meeting on June 11, 1861. The six most-influential political and military leaders in the State of Missouri at the start of the American Civil War – Major General Sterling Price, Governor Claiborne Jackson, Thomas Snead, Brigadier General Nathaniel Lyon, Colonel Francis P. Blair, … More Major Horace A. Conant and the Planter’s House Hotel Meeting

A Rare Sight of Union Troops Drilling in Missouri

Every day I am amazed by the number of primary sources that I have never stumbled upon before, especially with Missouri Civil War-related sources. To be fair, though, I have only been digging around for this kind of material since I started working at the Missouri Civil War Museum in 2011. Nonetheless, I am familiar … More A Rare Sight of Union Troops Drilling in Missouri

Take a Tour of the Camp Jackson Affair in Downtown St. Louis

Considered to be the culminating event of early-war tension in St. Louis, the Camp Jackson Affair changed the course of Missouri’s neutrality and the state’s role in the ensuing Civil War. With 28 people dead and scores more wounded, including women and children, the nation was shocked by the violence and the conduct of Federal … More Take a Tour of the Camp Jackson Affair in Downtown St. Louis

A St. Louis Civilian Flies the Rebel Flag in 1862

On May 16, 1862, Mrs. Amos on 6th Street received a harsh and threatening letter from St. Louis Provost Marshal George Leighton. In the back of her house, she – or another occupant of the building – flew the Rebel flag in defiance of Federal occupation of the city. Open sympathies with the Confederacy made … More A St. Louis Civilian Flies the Rebel Flag in 1862

The Western Sanitary Commission Helps to Supply Grant’s Army at Vicksburg

In the late summer of 1861, Maj. Gen. John C. Fremont authorized the establishment of the Western Sanitary Commission, the western counterpart to the United States Sanitary Commission (USSC), based in St. Louis, Missouri via the General Order No. 159. Fremont and many other pro-Union Missouri leaders argued that the USSC was too concerned with … More The Western Sanitary Commission Helps to Supply Grant’s Army at Vicksburg

Remembering Missouri’s German Soldiers

When both historians and Civil War enthusiasts think of the larger German experience during the war, we tend to think of their failures, hence their degrading nickname, the “Damn Dutch.” The XI Corps’ routing at Chancellorsville and at Gettysburg dominate the overall narrative of ethnic German soldiers, a trend that has persisted since the war … More Remembering Missouri’s German Soldiers