When Nathaniel Lyon Court Martialed the Second Cousin of Robert E. Lee

In the years prior to the outbreak of the Civil War, well over two-hundred future field commanders in the war were stationed in Missouri. These soldiers included Robert E. Lee, Ulysses Grant, James Longstreet, William T. Sherman, Braxton Bragg, and many others. They were trained and drilled on the parade ground of Jefferson Barracks Military Post located only a few miles south of St. Louis along the Mississippi River.

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Willie Lee is shown on the far left with a war-time image of Jefferson Barracks and Nathaniel Lyon on the right. Courtesy of the Reeves Family, Civil War Scholars, Missouri Civil War Museum, and The State Historical Society of Missouri.

Though many – like Ulysses Grant and J.E.B. Stuart – largely had positive experiences serving near one of the largest cities in the United States, some soldiers’ services at Jefferson Barracks were blotted with challenges. One of these soldiers was Lieutenant William “Willie” Fitzhugh Lee. Continue reading “When Nathaniel Lyon Court Martialed the Second Cousin of Robert E. Lee”

Compton & Dry, Plate 10

Compton & Dry’s Pictorial History of St. Louis continues to fascinate me every time. This invaluable resource takes you on a visual journey to 1875 St. Louis. In 222 pages, sketch artists figuratively took to the skies in hot air balloons to document the Gateway City in its entirety. So detailed is the book that it certainly looked like it was done that way.

Though published ten years after the guns went silent, Compton & Dry’s book is an utter masterpiece, showing life in St. Louis not long after the war. We can get a sense of post-war St. Louis and how this city grew in its wake.

I want to look at one plate – Plate 10 – which shows the western edge of the United States Arsenal grounds, Lyon Park, and the Bavarian Brewing Company campus (later famously known as Anheuser-Busch). To think that several iconic sites of Civil War St. Louis can be seen here is truly remarkable.

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Compton & Dry’s Pictorial St. Louis – Plate 10 – in 1875. Courtesy of the Library of Congress.

Continue reading “Compton & Dry, Plate 10”

Major Horace A. Conant and the Planter’s House Hotel Meeting

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Two illustrations show the Planter’s House Hotel ca. 1860, as well as the fateful meeting on June 11, 1861. Note the image on the right leaves out Snead and Conant – two forgotten individuals at the meeting. There was also no image of Conant to be found. Courtesy of the Missouri Historical Society and the Civil War Muse.

Many of us know the story of the infamous Planter’s House Hotel meeting on June 11, 1861. The six most-influential political and military leaders in the State of Missouri at the start of the American Civil War – Major General Sterling Price, Governor Claiborne Jackson, Thomas Snead, Brigadier General Nathaniel Lyon, Colonel Francis P. Blair, and Major Horace Conant – met in St. Louis’ Planter’s House Hotel to prevent the outbreak of war within the state’s borders. Five of the six attendees of the meeting are very well known in Missouri Civil War lexicon. The only one who many are not aware of is Major Horace Conant, Nathaniel Lyon’s aide. Continue reading “Major Horace A. Conant and the Planter’s House Hotel Meeting”

Major Samuel D. Sturgis Reports on the Death of General Nathaniel Lyon

Just ten days after the defeat of the Army of the West at the Battle of Wilson’s Creek, Major Samuel D. Sturgis wrote his official report from army headquarters at Camp Cary Gratz near Rolla, Missouri. His “baptism of fire” of the Civil War could not have been more of a nightmare for Sturgis: losing the Army’s commanding general, then having to assume command of a division-size force, and being forced to retreat from the field. A controversial figure at the time for his fiery personality, devotion to the Union, and his role in the Camp Jackson Affair that May, Brigadier General Nathaniel Lyon became the first Union general to die in combat. Wilson’s Creek marked the second major Federal defeat, and battle, of the war.

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Photograph of a painting by Levin & Mulligan, depicting the death of Brigadier General Nathaniel Lyon at Wilson’s Creek. Courtesy of Wilson’s Creek National Battlefield.

Continue reading “Major Samuel D. Sturgis Reports on the Death of General Nathaniel Lyon”